The Relationship Between Stimulability and Phonological Acquisition in Children With Normally Developing and Disordered Phonologies The relationship between stimulability and phonological acquisition was investigated in eight children, four with phonological disorders who were aged 3;10 (years;months) to 5;7 and four with normally developing phonologies who were aged 3;6 to 4;1. Children with disordered phonologies received treatment on one nonstimulable fricative. A multiple baseline, across subjects, ... Research Article
Research Article  |   November 01, 1999
The Relationship Between Stimulability and Phonological Acquisition in Children With Normally Developing and Disordered Phonologies
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Adele W. Miccio
    The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA
  • Mary Elbert
    Indiana University, Bloomington, IN
  • Karen Forrest
    Indiana University, Bloomington, IN
  • Contact author: Adele W. Miccio, PhD, Department of Communication Disorders, The Pennsylvania State University, 110 Moore Bldg, University Park, PA 16802.
    Contact author: Adele W. Miccio, PhD, Department of Communication Disorders, The Pennsylvania State University, 110 Moore Bldg, University Park, PA 16802.×
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: awm4@psu.edu.
Article Information
Development / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Articles
Research Article   |   November 01, 1999
The Relationship Between Stimulability and Phonological Acquisition in Children With Normally Developing and Disordered Phonologies
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 1999, Vol. 8, 347-363. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0804.347
History: Received January 4, 1999 , Accepted June 30, 1999
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 1999, Vol. 8, 347-363. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0804.347
History: Received January 4, 1999; Accepted June 30, 1999

The relationship between stimulability and phonological acquisition was investigated in eight children, four with phonological disorders who were aged 3;10 (years;months) to 5;7 and four with normally developing phonologies who were aged 3;6 to 4;1. Children with disordered phonologies received treatment on one nonstimulable fricative. A multiple baseline, across subjects, single-subject design was used for experimental control of the treatment aspect of this study. Children with normally developing phonologies were examined at the beginning of the study and upon termination of treatment for the children with disorders. These data were obtained to determine the relationship of stimulability to normal acquisition. In both cases stimulable sounds underwent the most change and stimulability was related to the learning patterns observed. This study supports the hypothesis that nonstimulable sounds are least likely to change without treatment. The results also suggest that stimulability for production of a sound may signal that it is being acquired naturally.

Author Note
This work was supported in part by a grant from the National Institutes of Health (DC00260). Gratitude is extended to Julie Church, Michael Gettleman, Penny Huddleston, Kelly Klecka, Risa Kruphoff, Tina Leslie, Lauri Peter and Lynn Utterback for their assistance in data collection. We would especially like to thank two anonymous reviewers for their helpful comments on an earlier version of this manuscript.
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