Service Delivery Considerations in Working With Clients From Cantonese-Speaking Backgrounds Professionals in communication disorders serve a linguistically and culturally diverse population, including a growing Asian population. Asians/Pacific Islanders are the fastest-growing ethnic minority in the United States, accounting for 14% of the U.S. population increase in 1996 (Uffen, 1998); the Asian/Pacific Islander population in the United States grew by ... World View
World View  |   November 01, 1999
Service Delivery Considerations in Working With Clients From Cantonese-Speaking Backgrounds
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Floria Fung
    Associated Learning and Language Specialists, San Francisco, CA
  • Celeste Roseberry-McKibbin
    California State University, Sacramento
  • Contact author: Celeste Roseberry-McKibbin, PhD, Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, 6000 J Street, California State University, Sacramento, CA 95819
    Contact author: Celeste Roseberry-McKibbin, PhD, Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, 6000 J Street, California State University, Sacramento, CA 95819×
  • The first author is a Cantonese speaker who immigrated from Hong Kong as an adult. The second author lived in Southeast Asia from ages 6–17 years. The information is based on the authors’ experiences of living in Asia, coming to live in the United States as young adults, and serving Cantonese-speaking clients in the United States. Additional information is based on available publications regarding Cantonese language and culture.
    The first author is a Cantonese speaker who immigrated from Hong Kong as an adult. The second author lived in Southeast Asia from ages 6–17 years. The information is based on the authors’ experiences of living in Asia, coming to live in the United States as young adults, and serving Cantonese-speaking clients in the United States. Additional information is based on available publications regarding Cantonese language and culture.×
  • Contact author: Celeste Roseberry-McKibbin, PhD, Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, 6000 J Street, California State University, Sacramento, CA 95819
    Contact author: Celeste Roseberry-McKibbin, PhD, Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, 6000 J Street, California State University, Sacramento, CA 95819×
Article Information
Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / World View
World View   |   November 01, 1999
Service Delivery Considerations in Working With Clients From Cantonese-Speaking Backgrounds
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 1999, Vol. 8, 309-318. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0804.309
History: Received June 4, 1998 , Accepted February 1, 1999
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 1999, Vol. 8, 309-318. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0804.309
History: Received June 4, 1998; Accepted February 1, 1999
Professionals in communication disorders serve a linguistically and culturally diverse population, including a growing Asian population. Asians/Pacific Islanders are the fastest-growing ethnic minority in the United States, accounting for 14% of the U.S. population increase in 1996 (Uffen, 1998); the Asian/Pacific Islander population in the United States grew by 95% between 1980 and 1990 (Gall & Gall, 1993). Because ethnic and racial minorities will outnumber whites during the 21st century, a major goal of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) is to increase clinicians’ sensitivity to and knowledge of the cultural and linguistic characteristics of diverse clients (ASHA, 1992; PetersJohnson, 1992; Uffen, 1998). This article adds to the body of knowledge about Cantonese-speaking Chinese clients, with an emphasis on those from Hong Kong.
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