Fiberoptic Examination of Swallowing in Children and Young Adults With Severe Developmental Disability Why are swallowing examinations important for persons who have developmental disabilities? Between 39% and 56% of persons with disabilities have some difficulty in feeding (Denhoff, 1981; Love, Hagerman, & Taimi, 1980; Palmer, Thompson, & Linscheid, 1975; Thomas, Bax, & Jenkins, 1989). Many of these problems are associated with the ... Clinical Consult
Clinical Consult  |   November 01, 1999
Fiberoptic Examination of Swallowing in Children and Young Adults With Severe Developmental Disability
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lawrence E. Migliore
    Matheny Institute of Applied Research, Matheny School & Hospital, Peapack, NJ
  • Frederic J. Scoopo
    Matheny Institute of Applied Research, Matheny School & Hospital, Peapack, NJ
  • Kenneth L. Robey
    Matheny Institute of Applied Research, Matheny School & Hospital, Peapack, NJ
  • Contact author: Larry Migliore, Director of Speech Therapy, Matheny School & Hospital, P.O. Box 339, Peapack, NJ 07977.
    Contact author: Larry Migliore, Director of Speech Therapy, Matheny School & Hospital, P.O. Box 339, Peapack, NJ 07977.×
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: research@matheny.org
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Special Populations / Clinical Consult
Clinical Consult   |   November 01, 1999
Fiberoptic Examination of Swallowing in Children and Young Adults With Severe Developmental Disability
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 1999, Vol. 8, 303-308. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0804.303
History: Received March 29, 1999 , Accepted September 7, 1999
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 1999, Vol. 8, 303-308. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0804.303
History: Received March 29, 1999; Accepted September 7, 1999
Why are swallowing examinations important for persons who have developmental disabilities?
Between 39% and 56% of persons with disabilities have some difficulty in feeding (Denhoff, 1981; Love, Hagerman, & Taimi, 1980; Palmer, Thompson, & Linscheid, 1975; Thomas, Bax, & Jenkins, 1989). Many of these problems are associated with the swallowing process, the passage of substances through the pharynx and to the esophagus. Such problems are particularly prevalent in persons who have cerebral palsy, the most common cause of congenital neurogenic dysphagia (Christensen, 1989).
In persons who have severe neurodevelopmental disorders, a significant amount of impairment in swallowing and in the coordination of the processes of alimentation and ventilation may occur. The complex system of reflexes that coordinates the two functions may be disrupted to varying degrees in children with congenital neurogenic dysphagia. The resulting incoordination of the two functions can result in its mildest form in difficult swallowing or, in more severe cases, in recurrent and potentially life-threatening aspiration pneumonia.
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access