Language Choice in Intervention With Bilingual Children Practitioners involved in the development of educational programs and clinical services for child learners of English as a second language (ESL) are challenged when they make decisions about which language(s) to use in intervention. Questions that often arise in the decision-making process with bilingual learners include: Would intervention in ... Viewpoint
Viewpoint  |   November 01, 1999
Language Choice in Intervention With Bilingual Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Vera F. Gutierrez-Clellen
    San Diego State University, CA
  • Contact author: Vera F. Gutierrez-Clellen, PhD, Department of Communicative Disorders, College of Health & Human Services, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA 92182-1518.
    Contact author: Vera F. Gutierrez-Clellen, PhD, Department of Communicative Disorders, College of Health & Human Services, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA 92182-1518.×
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: vclellen@mail.sdsu.edu
Article Information
Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Viewpoint
Viewpoint   |   November 01, 1999
Language Choice in Intervention With Bilingual Children
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 1999, Vol. 8, 291-302. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0804.291
History: Received April 12, 1999 , Accepted August 12, 1999
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 1999, Vol. 8, 291-302. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0804.291
History: Received April 12, 1999; Accepted August 12, 1999
Practitioners involved in the development of educational programs and clinical services for child learners of English as a second language (ESL) are challenged when they make decisions about which language(s) to use in intervention. Questions that often arise in the decision-making process with bilingual learners include: Would intervention in the first language (L1) delay acquisition of a second language (L2)? Should intervention be conducted in English only? Would bilingual intervention “tax” the limited language-learning resources of children with language disorders? Answers to these questions vary with the language attitudes of the respondents, their belief systems, their own experience as foreign-language learners, and their assumptions about the processes of first (L1) and second-language (L2) acquisition, among other factors.
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