Sentence Recast Use by Parents of Children With Typical Language and Children With Specific Language Impairment Many early studies failed to find differences in the language input of parents to children with specific language impairments (SLI) when compared to the input provided for MLU-matched children with typical language (TL). More recent investigations have revealed significant differences in the frequency of sentence recasts provided to young children. ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 1999
Sentence Recast Use by Parents of Children With Typical Language and Children With Specific Language Impairment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Marc E. Fey
    University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City
  • Tracy E. Krulik
    University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City
  • Diane Frome Loeb
    University of Kansas, Kansas City
  • Kerry Proctor-Williams
    University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City
  • Contact author: Marc E. Fey, PhD, Hearing and Speech Department, The University of Kansas Medical Center, 3031 Miller, 3901 Rainbow Boulevard, Kansas City, KS 66106-7605. Email: mfey@kumc.edu
Article Information
Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 1999
Sentence Recast Use by Parents of Children With Typical Language and Children With Specific Language Impairment
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 1999, Vol. 8, 273-286. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0803.273
History: Received January 25, 1999 , Accepted June 30, 1999
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 1999, Vol. 8, 273-286. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0803.273
History: Received January 25, 1999; Accepted June 30, 1999

Many early studies failed to find differences in the language input of parents to children with specific language impairments (SLI) when compared to the input provided for MLU-matched children with typical language (TL). More recent investigations have revealed significant differences in the frequency of sentence recasts provided to young children. Specifically, parents of children with SLI have been shown to produce fewer recasts than do parents of younger children with TL. Because recasts have been shown to facilitate morphosyntactic development, these findings have important assessment and treatment implications.

The purpose of this study was to replicate and extend these recent findings. The sentence recast usage of the parents of 10 children with SLI was compared with the recast usage of parents of 10 younger children with TL at two points in time. This strategy enabled us to examine specific hypotheses about the quantity of recasts used by parents and the changes in patterns of use over time. The results failed to confirm recent findings; there were no differences between groups at either time. We interpret this to suggest that parents of children with SLI may not differ substantially from parents of children with TL in recast usage, at least in the early preschool years when the age gap separating children with SLI and language-matched children with TL is not great. Nevertheless, to benefit from their facilitative properties, children with SLI seem to need recasts that are more frequent or more focused on specific targets than are typically available in their environments.

Authors Note
This study was supported (in part) by research grant R01 DC 01817 from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders and by center grant HD02528 from the National Institute on Child Health and Human Development. The authors gratefully acknowledge the assistance of Jayne Brandel, Bonnie Johnson, and P. J. Seymour in all aspects of this study. We also thank Tim Brackenbury, Jennifer Chaffee, Michelle Christman, Bonny Diederich, Jane Gillette, Jennifer Lay, Steven Long, Heather Meyer, Melissa Meyer, Tasha Pearson, Tracie Peck, Stephanie Pickert, Rachel Pratte, Dan Ruhnke, Rebecca Schmalz, Christy Schneller, Kerri Schreiber, and Shari Sokol for their help with data collection and/or transcription.
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