Nasalance in the Speech of Children With Normal Hearing and Children With Hearing Loss Three new tests were introduced in this study to compare nasal resonance and speaking time of 30 children 8 to 11 years old who were profoundly deaf with that of 30 children with normal hearing in a matched control group. The ANS-P plane was introduced to position the palatometer sound ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 1999
Nasalance in the Speech of Children With Normal Hearing and Children With Hearing Loss
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Samuel G. Fletcher
    University of Alabama at Birmingham and University of Indonesia, Jakarta, Pusat
  • Fuad Mahfuzh
    University of Indonesia, Jakarta, Pusat
  • Hendarto Hendarmin
    University of Indonesia, Jakarta, Pusat
  • Contact author: Samuel G. Fletcher, PhD, 1725 East 250 South, Springville, UT 84663.
    Contact author: Samuel G. Fletcher, PhD, 1725 East 250 South, Springville, UT 84663.×
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 1999
Nasalance in the Speech of Children With Normal Hearing and Children With Hearing Loss
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 1999, Vol. 8, 241-248. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0803.241
History: Received October 5, 1998 , Accepted March 12, 1999
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 1999, Vol. 8, 241-248. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0803.241
History: Received October 5, 1998; Accepted March 12, 1999

Three new tests were introduced in this study to compare nasal resonance and speaking time of 30 children 8 to 11 years old who were profoundly deaf with that of 30 children with normal hearing in a matched control group. The ANS-P plane was introduced to position the palatometer sound separation plate. This enabled the plate to be brought easily and repeatedly into the desired standard position despite widely varying facial contours of the subjects. The findings from this study showed the group with hearing loss had significantly more nasalance than did the normal group when nasal consonants were absent and significantly less when an utterance was loaded heavily with nasal consonants. These differences were interpreted as evidence of some limitation in the ability of the children with hearing loss to monitor and control nasal versus oral sound emission. Speaking time was longer in the group of children with hearing loss but was not related to the nasalance score.

Authors Note
We thank those who volunteered to serve as subjects in this study.
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