A Qualitative Study of Feedback in Aphasia Treatment A qualitative research study was completed using ethnographic and conversation analysis methodologies to explore characteristics and functions of feedback in traditional aphasia treatment sessions. The investigators identified and described multiple functions of clinician feedback based on analysis of 15 aphasia treatment sessions. Feedback not only provided general motivation and shaped ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 1999
A Qualitative Study of Feedback in Aphasia Treatment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Nina Simmons-Mackie
    Southeastern Louisiana University, Hammond
  • Jack S. Damico
    University of Southwestern Louisiana, Lafayette
  • Holly L. Damico
    University of Southwestern Louisiana, Lafayette
  • Contact author: Nina Simmons-Mackie, PhD, 59020 Highway 433, Slidell, LA 70460
    Contact author: Nina Simmons-Mackie, PhD, 59020 Highway 433, Slidell, LA 70460×
Article Information
Language Disorders / Aphasia / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 1999
A Qualitative Study of Feedback in Aphasia Treatment
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 1999, Vol. 8, 218-230. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0803.218
History: Received October 26, 1998 , Accepted March 10, 1999
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 1999, Vol. 8, 218-230. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0803.218
History: Received October 26, 1998; Accepted March 10, 1999

A qualitative research study was completed using ethnographic and conversation analysis methodologies to explore characteristics and functions of feedback in traditional aphasia treatment sessions. The investigators identified and described multiple functions of clinician feedback based on analysis of 15 aphasia treatment sessions. Feedback not only provided general motivation and shaped targeted language behavior, but also assisted in establishing the discourse structure of treatment and in managing important interactional aspects of the exchange. Understanding the multiple roles of feedback in treatment interactions might help clinicians improve the efficiency and effectiveness of aphasia treatment and assist in training student clinicians.

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