Preparation of Speech-Language Pathologists to Provide Services to Patients With a Tracheostomy Tube A Survey Research Article
Research Article  |   May 01, 1999
Preparation of Speech-Language Pathologists to Provide Services to Patients With a Tracheostomy Tube
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Stacy B. Manley
    NHC HealthCare Lexington, West Columbia, SC University of South Carolina, Columbia
  • Elaine M. Frank
    University of South Carolina, Columbia
  • Caryn F. Melvin
    Dorn Veteran Administration Hospital, Columbia
  • Contact author: Stacy B. Manley, Department of Speech Language Pathology and Audiology, The University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208.
  • Corresponding author: email: Brickmans@aol.com
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Research Articles
Research Article   |   May 01, 1999
Preparation of Speech-Language Pathologists to Provide Services to Patients With a Tracheostomy Tube
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 1999, Vol. 8, 171-180. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0802.171
History: Received March 31, 1998 , Accepted February 17, 1999
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 1999, Vol. 8, 171-180. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0802.171
History: Received March 31, 1998; Accepted February 17, 1999

Speech-language pathologists often are consulted to facilitate communication and swallowing for patients with a tracheostomy tube. The purpose of this study was to survey the clinical knowledge base of speech-language pathologists serving patients with tracheotomy and the level of confidence they place in their ability to provide professional treatment to these persons. Practicing speech-language pathologists have varying levels of didactic preparation for making treatment decisions with these patients; results revealed that only about half report that they feel confident serving this population. Speech-language pathologists requested additional coursework, inservice training, and clinical exposure to tracheostomized patients to increase their confidence in serving these patients. Ethical considerations related to professional preparation and training are discussed.

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