Assessing the Language of Children With Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) involves, according to theory, an underlying impairment of executive function—the cognitively based control system that regulates behavior. It is possible that this executive dysfunction interferes with performance on certain tasks used to identify language impairment (LI). We compared the performance of 3 groups of children ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 1999
Assessing the Language of Children With Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Janis Oram
    The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario
  • Jonathan Fine
    Bar-Ilan University, Israel
  • Carol Okamoto
    The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario
  • Rosemary Tannock
    The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario
  • Contact author: Rosemary Tannock, PhD, Brain and Behaviour Research Programme (Psychiatry), The Hospital for Sick Children, 555 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5G 1X8.
    Contact author: Rosemary Tannock, PhD, Brain and Behaviour Research Programme (Psychiatry), The Hospital for Sick Children, 555 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5G 1X8.×
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: tannock@sickkids.on.ca
Article Information
Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 1999
Assessing the Language of Children With Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 1999, Vol. 8, 72-80. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0801.72
History: Received May 28, 1998 , Accepted September 29, 1998
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 1999, Vol. 8, 72-80. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0801.72
History: Received May 28, 1998; Accepted September 29, 1998

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) involves, according to theory, an underlying impairment of executive function—the cognitively based control system that regulates behavior. It is possible that this executive dysfunction interferes with performance on certain tasks used to identify language impairment (LI). We compared the performance of 3 groups of children aged 7 to 11 years: ADHDonly (n = 25), ADHD+LI (n = 28), and non-ADHD controls (n = 24), on 18 tasks within 3 language measures (Test of Word Finding, Rosner’s Auditory Analysis Test, Clinical Evaluation of Language Fundamentals-Revised). Children with ADHD-only performed like those without the disorder on most tasks examined. However, the CELF-R Formulated Sentences subtest was particularly difficult for children with ADHD-only. In-depth error analysis indicated that aspects of the executive dysfunction in ADHD such as impulsivity and pragmatic deficits may have influenced performance on this subtest. Clinical implications for testing children with ADHD are discussed.

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