Participation of a Conversation Partner in the Word Searches of a Person With Aphasia Conversation analysis was applied to answer the question of when and how a conversation partner participates in the word searches of a person with aphasia. Thirty-eight videotaped conversational sequences from eight naturally occurring conversations of a single couple were analyzed. Sequences were characterized by the spouse’s participation in the self-initiated ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 1999
Participation of a Conversation Partner in the Word Searches of a Person With Aphasia
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Mary L. Oelschlaeger
    University of New Mexico, Albuquerque
  • 1Currently affiliated with Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff.
    Currently affiliated with Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff.×
  • Contact author: Mary L. Oelschlaeger, Northern Arizona University, Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, P.O. Box 15045, Flagstaff, AZ 86011-5045
    Contact author: Mary L. Oelschlaeger, Northern Arizona University, Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, P.O. Box 15045, Flagstaff, AZ 86011-5045×
Article Information
Normal Language Processing / Language Disorders / Aphasia / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 1999
Participation of a Conversation Partner in the Word Searches of a Person With Aphasia
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 1999, Vol. 8, 62-71. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0801.62
History: Received June 4, 1998 , Accepted September 28, 1998
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 1999, Vol. 8, 62-71. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0801.62
History: Received June 4, 1998; Accepted September 28, 1998

Conversation analysis was applied to answer the question of when and how a conversation partner participates in the word searches of a person with aphasia. Thirty-eight videotaped conversational sequences from eight naturally occurring conversations of a single couple were analyzed. Sequences were characterized by the spouse’s participation in the self-initiated word searches of her partner, who had aphasia. Sequences were analyzed on a turn-by-turn basis to reveal their sequential organization. Results showed that participation was determined by interactional techniques and interactional resources. Interactional techniques included direct and indirect invitations to participate. Direct invitation was constructed via direct gaze or a wh- question. Indirect invitation was constructed with verbal and nonverbal signals, including specific metalanguage and downward gaze. Interactional resources were information states derived from both life experience and online analysis. Research and clinical implications are discussed.

Acknowledgment
The author wishes to thank the person with aphasia-conversational dyad, Ed and M, for their interest and support in permitting the study of their naturally occurring conversation.
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