Training Analogical Reasoning Skills in Children With Language Disorders The benefit or effects of direct training of analogical reasoning was examined in school-aged children with language disorders. Analogy training was divided into two phases. The first phase consisted of direct instruction in the componential processes of analogical reasoning, and the second phase included bridging activities incorporated into school curriculum ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 1999
Training Analogical Reasoning Skills in Children With Language Disorders
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Julie J. Masterson
    Southwest Missouri State University
  • Christine D. Perrey
    Southwest Missouri State University
  • Contact author: Julie J. Masterson, PhD, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Southwest Missouri State University, 901 South National, Springfield, MO 65804.
    Contact author: Julie J. Masterson, PhD, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Southwest Missouri State University, 901 South National, Springfield, MO 65804.×
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: JulieMasterson@mail.smsu.edu
Article Information
School-Based Settings / Language Disorders / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 1999
Training Analogical Reasoning Skills in Children With Language Disorders
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 1999, Vol. 8, 53-61. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0801.53
History: Received December 11, 1997 , Accepted September 28, 1998
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 1999, Vol. 8, 53-61. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0801.53
History: Received December 11, 1997; Accepted September 28, 1998

The benefit or effects of direct training of analogical reasoning was examined in school-aged children with language disorders. Analogy training was divided into two phases. The first phase consisted of direct instruction in the componential processes of analogical reasoning, and the second phase included bridging activities incorporated into school curriculum and life-skill situations. The performance of the trained children was compared to the performance of a control group of peers with language disorders, matched for mental age. There was a significant positive effect for training on students’ performance on verbal analogy problems.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access