Stimulability, Speech Perception Skills, and the Treatment of Phonological Disorders The relationship between stimulability, speech perception ability, and phonological learning was examined in two descriptive studies. In Study 1, the children received 9 group treatment sessions targeting 3 phonological processes using the cycles approach. Treatment progress was not observed for sounds that were unstimulable before treatment. Given stimulability, treatment progress ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 1999
Stimulability, Speech Perception Skills, and the Treatment of Phonological Disorders
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Susan Rvachew
    Alberta Children’s Hospital, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
  • Susan Rafaat
    Alberta Children’s Hospital, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
  • Monique Martin
    Alberta Children’s Hospital, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
  • Contact author: S. Rvachew, PhD, Speech-Language Section, Alberta Children’s Hospital, 1820 Richmond Road SW, Calgary, Alberta, Canada, T2T 5C7.
    Contact author: S. Rvachew, PhD, Speech-Language Section, Alberta Children’s Hospital, 1820 Richmond Road SW, Calgary, Alberta, Canada, T2T 5C7.×
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: rvachew@ucalgary.ca
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Hearing & Speech Perception / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 1999
Stimulability, Speech Perception Skills, and the Treatment of Phonological Disorders
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 1999, Vol. 8, 33-43. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0801.33
History: Received May 11, 1998 , Accepted July 16, 1998
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 1999, Vol. 8, 33-43. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0801.33
History: Received May 11, 1998; Accepted July 16, 1998

The relationship between stimulability, speech perception ability, and phonological learning was examined in two descriptive studies. In Study 1, the children received 9 group treatment sessions targeting 3 phonological processes using the cycles approach. Treatment progress was not observed for sounds that were unstimulable before treatment. Given stimulability, treatment progress was greater for sounds that were well perceived before treatment in contrast with sounds that were poorly perceived before treatment. In Study 2, the cycles approach was modified so that each child received 3 brief, individual treatment sessions followed by 6 group treatment sessions. Each individual session targeted stimulability of target sounds, using phonetic placement, and perception of target sounds, using the Speech Assessment and Interactive Learning System (SAILS). In Study 2, good progress was observed for most target phonemes, including those that were unstimulable or poorly perceived before treatment.

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