Analysis of Criteria for Graduate Admissions in Speech-Language Pathology Predictive Utility of Application Materials Research Article
Research Article  |   November 01, 1998
Analysis of Criteria for Graduate Admissions in Speech-Language Pathology
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Karen Forrest
    Indiana University, Bloomington
  • Rita C. Naremore
    Indiana University, Bloomington
  • Contact author: Karen Forrest, Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405. Email: kforrest@indiana.edu
    Contact author: Karen Forrest, Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405. Email: kforrest@indiana.edu×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Professional Issues & Training / Research Articles
Research Article   |   November 01, 1998
Analysis of Criteria for Graduate Admissions in Speech-Language Pathology
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 1998, Vol. 7, 57-61. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0704.57
History: Received December 30, 1997 , Accepted May 29, 1998
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 1998, Vol. 7, 57-61. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0704.57
History: Received December 30, 1997; Accepted May 29, 1998

Evaluations of applicants to most university speech and hearing programs rely on quantitative measures such as undergraduate grade point averages (UGPA) and scores on the aptitude portions of the Graduate Record Examinations (GREs). However, the ability of these factors to predict success of students pursuing master’s degrees in speech-language pathology has not been verified. In an effort to select the students who are most likely to excel in our graduate program, an analysis of factors used to evaluate applications to our master’s program was undertaken. Information was extracted from records of students enrolled in the Indiana University MA program in speech-language pathology between 1992 and 1995. Students chosen for this analysis were considered to be among the top or bottom students in their class, as measured by final graduate GPA and scores on the PRAXIS examination. A discriminant analysis was performed using UGPA, scores on the verbal, quantitative, and analytical subtests of the GREs, undergraduate university, and undergraduate major as input variables. This analysis indicated that students’ achievement in a master’s program could be predicted with 93% accuracy on the basis of UGPA alone. By contrast, when GRE scores were used to calculate the discriminant function, classification accuracy reached only 63%. A cross-validation analysis classified a second group of randomly selected students with 80% accuracy. The results of the current investigation are compared to studies in other disciplines that indicate limited utility of GRE scores in the prediction of students’ success in master’s degree programs.

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