Facilitating Peer Interaction Socially Relevant Objectives for Preschool Language Intervention Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus  |   November 01, 1998
Facilitating Peer Interaction
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Pamela A. Hadley
    Arizona State University, Tempe
  • C. Melanie Schuele
    University of Nevada, Reno
  • Contact author: Pamela A. Hadley, PhD, Speech and Hearing Science, P.O. Box 871908, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-1908. Email: hadley@asu.edu.
    Contact author: Pamela A. Hadley, PhD, Speech and Hearing Science, P.O. Box 871908, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-1908. Email: hadley@asu.edu.×
Article Information
Development / School-Based Settings / Language Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus   |   November 01, 1998
Facilitating Peer Interaction
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 1998, Vol. 7, 25-36. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0704.25
History: Received August 21, 1997 , Accepted July 6, 1998
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 1998, Vol. 7, 25-36. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0704.25
History: Received August 21, 1997; Accepted July 6, 1998

Research over the past decade has provided the rationale to target the peer-related social-communicative competence of children with specific language impairment (SLI). Yet our clinical experiences suggest that verbal interaction skills with peers rarely are emphasized in speech/language intervention with these children. We argue that it is particularly important for speech-language pathologists to target socially relevant language objectives with children with SLI because these children eventually must live up to standard societal expectations in social, educational, and vocational settings. In this paper, we identify several barriers that may prevent speech-language pathologists from addressing socially relevant language intervention objectives. Several case examples are provided to illustrate ways in which practitioners can address these types of objectives.

Acknowledgments
We wish to acknowledge the children, the parents, and the colleagues we have learned from over the past several years. Although the cases described in this paper are fictitious, they reflect composites of children we have encountered over the years. Many of the ideas in this paper originated while we were involved in ongoing research in the Language Acquisition Preschool, University of Kansas, Lawrence, and have been shaped by collaborations with Betty Bunce, Mabel Rice, and Kim Wilcox. Portions of this paper were presented during in-service presentations to practicing speech-language specialists in the Mesa Public Schools, Mesa, Arizona, and at the Rehabilitation Center for Children and Adults, Palm Beach, Florida. We thank these practitioners for their thoughtful reactions to the content presented here.
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