Spoken Language and Written Expression—Interplay of Delays Children with histories of early phonology disorders were assessed at school age for both spoken language and written expression skills. Results showed that children with a history of a phonology disorder performed more poorly on writing tasks than siblings developing normally. Children with histories of phonology disorders + additional language ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 1998
Spoken Language and Written Expression—Interplay of Delays
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Barbara A. Lewis
    Rainbow Babies’ and Children’s Hospital, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH
  • Becky O’Donnell
    Rainbow Babies’ and Children’s Hospital, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH
  • Lisa A. Freebairn
    Rainbow Babies’ and Children’s Hospital, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH
  • H. Gerry Taylor
    Rainbow Babies’ and Children’s Hospital, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH
  • Contact author: Barbara Lewis, Department of Pediatrics, Case Western Reserve University, 11100 Euclid Ave., Cleveland, OH 44106-6038. Email: bxl@po.cwru.edu
    Contact author: Barbara Lewis, Department of Pediatrics, Case Western Reserve University, 11100 Euclid Ave., Cleveland, OH 44106-6038. Email: bxl@po.cwru.edu×
Article Information
Development / Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Language Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 1998
Spoken Language and Written Expression—Interplay of Delays
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 1998, Vol. 7, 77-84. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0703.77
History: Received October 8, 1997 , Accepted March 16, 1998
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 1998, Vol. 7, 77-84. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0703.77
History: Received October 8, 1997; Accepted March 16, 1998

Children with histories of early phonology disorders were assessed at school age for both spoken language and written expression skills. Results showed that children with a history of a phonology disorder performed more poorly on writing tasks than siblings developing normally. Children with histories of phonology disorders + additional language disorders performed more poorly on writing tasks than children with histories of phonology disorders alone. Spoken language abilities, as measured by the CELF-R, best predicted written expression skills for both groups of children with phonology disorders. However, measures of the semantic and syntactic capacity of spoken language abilities did not correlate with corresponding aspects of written expression.

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