What Is the Take-Home Message From Curlee and Yairi? During the last decade or so, there has been increasing interest in the management of young children who start to stutter. This is reflected in a proliferation of reports in our professional literature of treatments that have been developed for these children. However, early intervention for stuttering is not ... Second Opinion
Second Opinion  |   August 01, 1998
What Is the Take-Home Message From Curlee and Yairi?
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ann Packman
    Australian Stuttering Research Centre The University of Sydney, Australia
  • Mark Onslow
    Australian Stuttering Research Centre The University of Sydney, Australia
  • Contact author: Ann Packman, PhD, Australian Stuttering Research Centre, University of Sydney, P.O. Box 170, Lidcombe 2141, Australia
    Contact author: Ann Packman, PhD, Australian Stuttering Research Centre, University of Sydney, P.O. Box 170, Lidcombe 2141, Australia×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Second Opinions
Second Opinion   |   August 01, 1998
What Is the Take-Home Message From Curlee and Yairi?
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 1998, Vol. 7, 5-9. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0703.05
History: Received July 25, 1997 , Accepted January 27, 1998
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 1998, Vol. 7, 5-9. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0703.05
History: Received July 25, 1997; Accepted January 27, 1998
During the last decade or so, there has been increasing interest in the management of young children who start to stutter. This is reflected in a proliferation of reports in our professional literature of treatments that have been developed for these children. However, early intervention for stuttering is not without controversy, for it is common knowledge that many children who start to stutter will remit without treatment. In a report of a study of 1,000 families in the United Kingdom, Andrews and Harris (1964)  suggested that the rate of spontaneous recovery from stuttering in the general population may be as high as 79%. Consequently, recommendations for early intervention have been countered with occasional suggestions that treatment should be withheld until it is clear that a child will not recover spontaneously (see Andrews, 1984; Curlee, 1993).
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