Increasing the Recruitment and Retention of Historically Underrepresented Minority Students in Higher Education A Case Study Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus  |   August 01, 1998
Increasing the Recruitment and Retention of Historically Underrepresented Minority Students in Higher Education
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Terry Irvine Saenz
    California State University, Fullerton
  • Toya A. Wyatt
    California State University, Fullerton
  • John C. Reinard
    California State University, Fullerton
  • Contact author: Terry Irvine Saenz, Department of Speech Communication, EC-199, California State University–Fullerton, Fullerton, CA 92834. E-mail: tsaenz@fullerton.edu
    Contact author: Terry Irvine Saenz, Department of Speech Communication, EC-199, California State University–Fullerton, Fullerton, CA 92834. E-mail: tsaenz@fullerton.edu×
Article Information
Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Professional Issues & Training / Language Disorders / Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus   |   August 01, 1998
Increasing the Recruitment and Retention of Historically Underrepresented Minority Students in Higher Education
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 1998, Vol. 7, 39-48. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0703.39
History: Received August 5, 1997 , Accepted May 4, 1998
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 1998, Vol. 7, 39-48. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0703.39
History: Received August 5, 1997; Accepted May 4, 1998

There is a need for more bilingual and/or minority speech-language pathologists to serve an increasingly diverse population. To recruit and retain minority students, faculty in university training programs should increase their awareness of minority students’ needs and expectations. This paper reviews the literature pertaining to the factors relating to minority students’ success in higher education and reports the results of a survey designed to assess students’ perceptions of factors related to academic success. It also delineates how faculty of the Department of Communicative Disorders at California State University, Fullerton, used these results to improve the recruitment and retention of minority students. Because there is a dynamic relationship between faculty, students, and institutional requirements, other communicative disorders departments are encouraged to use this survey to better understand and respond to their students’ needs.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported in part by Affirmative Action grants from California State University, Fullerton. We wish to thank all of the Communicative Disorders faculty at California State University, Fullerton, for their participation in this research, including the following individuals: Michael Davis, Mary Blake Huer, Kurt Kitselman, Edith Li, Arden Thorum, Kenneth Tom, and Vicki Young. We also wish to thank the students and former students who participated in the study. We acknowledge Joyce Flocken, Kurt Kitselman, Henriette Langdon, and Elizabeth Paganini for assisting with earlier versions of this article, and our department chair, Robert Emry, for his support of the project.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access