The Capability-Focus Treatment Framework for Child Speech Disorders The goals of this report are to describe a treatment framework for child speech disorders, to summarize findings on the predictive validity of the framework, and to stimulate discussion of associated treatment issues. Since 1984, the capability-focus treatment framework has been used in a university speech clinic by over 200 ... Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus  |   August 01, 1998
The Capability-Focus Treatment Framework for Child Speech Disorders
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Joan Kwiatkowski
    Department of Communicative Disorders and Waisman Center on Mental Retardation and Human Development University of Wisconsin–Madison
  • Lawrence D. Shriberg
    Department of Communicative Disorders and Waisman Center on Mental Retardation and Human Development University of Wisconsin–Madison
  • Contact author: Joan Kwiatkowski or Lawrence Shriberg, Waisman Center on Mental Retardation and Human Development, University of Wisconsin–Madison, 1500 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI 53705. E-mail: Kwiatkowski@waisman.wisc.edu or Shriberg@waisman.wisc.edu
    Contact author: Joan Kwiatkowski or Lawrence Shriberg, Waisman Center on Mental Retardation and Human Development, University of Wisconsin–Madison, 1500 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI 53705. E-mail: Kwiatkowski@waisman.wisc.edu or Shriberg@waisman.wisc.edu×
Article Information
Development / Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus   |   August 01, 1998
The Capability-Focus Treatment Framework for Child Speech Disorders
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 1998, Vol. 7, 27-38. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0703.27
History: Received September 11, 1997 , Accepted April 21, 1998
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 1998, Vol. 7, 27-38. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0703.27
History: Received September 11, 1997; Accepted April 21, 1998

The goals of this report are to describe a treatment framework for child speech disorders, to summarize findings on the predictive validity of the framework, and to stimulate discussion of associated treatment issues. Since 1984, the capability-focus treatment framework has been used in a university speech clinic by over 200 student clinicians who treated approximately 260 preschool children with speech delay. The framework reflects a treatment philosophy that has been readily endorsed by student clinicians and clinical instructors for its efficacy but is challenging to document because of measurement constraints on the constructs of capability and focus. We describe theoretical and clinical foundations of the capability-focus framework, review findings from three studies using discriminant function and relative risk analyses, and discuss associated issues in measurement, theory, and clinical practice.

Acknowledgments
We thank the many graduate student clinicians at the University of Wisconsin-Madison Department of Communicative Disorders for their enthusiastic participation in several phases of these studies; Jane McSweeny for thorough research assistance, including insightful suggestions about the focus measures; Doris Kistler for helpful statistical guidance; and Diane Austin and Chad Allen for excellent editorial assistance. We also wish to acknowledge Marc Fey, Julie Masterson, Barbara Bain, Stephen Camarata, and an anonymous reviewer for editorial suggestions that significantly improved this manuscript. This research was supported by grant number DC00496 from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, National Institutes of Health.
Copies of the technical reports referenced in this paper can be viewed and downloaded from the Phonology Project website: http://www.waisman.wisc.edu/phonology/
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