Treatment Decisions for Young Children Who Stutter Further Concerns and Complexities Second Opinion
Second Opinion  |   August 01, 1998
Treatment Decisions for Young Children Who Stutter
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Roger J. Ingham
    University of California, Santa Barbara
  • Anne K. Cordes
    The University of Georgia, Athens
  • Contact author: Roger J. Ingham, Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of California, Contact author: Roger J. Ingham, Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of California, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 e-mail: rjingham@ucsbuxa.ucsb.edu
    Contact author: Roger J. Ingham, Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of California, Contact author: Roger J. Ingham, Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of California, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 e-mail: rjingham@ucsbuxa.ucsb.edu×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Second Opinions
Second Opinion   |   August 01, 1998
Treatment Decisions for Young Children Who Stutter
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 1998, Vol. 7, 10-19. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0703.10
History: Received October 20, 1997 , Accepted March 19, 1998
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 1998, Vol. 7, 10-19. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0703.10
History: Received October 20, 1997; Accepted March 19, 1998
Drs. Curlee and Yairi’s (1997)  recent paper provided some interesting and provocative comments regarding treatment for children who have been stuttering for less than approximately 2 years. Their paper raised several issues that were important, complex, and fully deserving of critical assessment. It was accompanied by two “Second Opinion” commentaries (Bernstein Ratner, 1997; Zebrowski, 1997), each of which addressed some additional pieces of this complex area, and each of which essentially agreed with Curlee and Yairi on two general points: that some children who stutter may not need clinical services, and that we have reason to be dissatisfied with the available evidence about treatment effectiveness for children who stutter. We do not entirely disagree, but the purpose of this response is to present an opinion about Curlee and Yairi’s paper that challenges their premises and their conclusions in several areas. These areas include the incidence and prevalence of stuttering, and whether those data provide evidence of high recovery rates; several issues related to determining whether treatments are effective and whether they should be recommended; and several issues related to the experimental evaluation of treatment effectiveness.
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