A Relationship Between Stimulability and the Efficacy of Visual Biofeedback in the Training of a Respiratory Control Task Although there are numerous reports of the use of biofeedback in clinical applications, little is known about the relative advantages or disadvantages of biofeedback over traditional treatments or about how to determine whether biofeedback might be effective for a given client. This study compares the results of two modalities of ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 1998
A Relationship Between Stimulability and the Efficacy of Visual Biofeedback in the Training of a Respiratory Control Task
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Robert A. Volin
    State University of New York at New Paltz
  • Contact author: Robert A. Volin, PhD, Department of Speech and Theatre, Lehman College (CUNY), 250 Bedford Park Boulevard West, Bronx, NY 10468-1589 Email: bobvolin@bestweb.net
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 1998
A Relationship Between Stimulability and the Efficacy of Visual Biofeedback in the Training of a Respiratory Control Task
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 1998, Vol. 7, 81-90. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0701.81
History: Received June 16, 1997 , Accepted November 26, 1997
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 1998, Vol. 7, 81-90. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0701.81
History: Received June 16, 1997; Accepted November 26, 1997

Although there are numerous reports of the use of biofeedback in clinical applications, little is known about the relative advantages or disadvantages of biofeedback over traditional treatments or about how to determine whether biofeedback might be effective for a given client. This study compares the results of two modalities of training on a respiratory rate control task. One group of normal young adult subjects (n=18) received postresponse verbal guidance (knowledge of results), whereas another similar group (n=18) received visual biofeedback training (a real-time form of knowledge of performance). The results suggest that biofeedback would be most effective for subjects with relatively poor response to initial training (stimulability), that verbal guidance and biofeedback are likely to be equally effective for those with midrange stimulability, and that those with relatively high stimulability may not benefit from biofeedback.

Author Note
Grateful thanks are extended to Joe Haas for his help in organizing the research protocol and for his digital artwork, and to Joe, Danyela Berndt, and Melinda Knapp for their assistance in recruiting subjects and administering the protocol. Thanks are also due to the reviewers of an earlier version of this paper for their insights and encouragement.
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