Accountability Measures Employed by Speech-Language Pathologists in Private Practice This study examined the accountability practices of speech-language pathologists employed in private practice. A second issue was the examination of speech-language pathologists' attitudes toward accountability. A stratified random sample of 1,000 speech-language pathologists in private practice, selected by ASHA from a database, served as participants. The participants were asked to ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 1998
Accountability Measures Employed by Speech-Language Pathologists in Private Practice
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Bonnie Brock Trulove
    Capitol Hill Healthcare Center, Montgomery, AL
  • James L. Fitch
    Auburn University, Auburn, AL
  • Contact author: James L. Fitch, PhD, Department of Communication Disorders, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849 e-mail: fitchjl@mail.auburn.edu
Article Information
Practice Management / Professional Issues & Training / Language Disorders / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 1998
Accountability Measures Employed by Speech-Language Pathologists in Private Practice
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 1998, Vol. 7, 75-80. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0701.75
History: Received February 24, 1997 , Accepted September 5, 1997
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 1998, Vol. 7, 75-80. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0701.75
History: Received February 24, 1997; Accepted September 5, 1997

This study examined the accountability practices of speech-language pathologists employed in private practice. A second issue was the examination of speech-language pathologists' attitudes toward accountability. A stratified random sample of 1,000 speech-language pathologists in private practice, selected by ASHA from a database, served as participants. The participants were asked to complete and return a questionnaire concerning the use of various accountability methods and their attitudes toward accountability. Results of this study suggest that the traditional methods of accountability in which the speech-language pathologist is trained are frequently used by most respondents. Respondents' attitudes toward accountability were found to be varied. Implications for use of the information obtained in this study are identified along with suggestions for improvement of accountability in the field of communication disorders.

Author Note
This article is a report on a portion of a thesis in partial fulfillment of a master’s degree by Bonnie Brock Trulove, directed by James L. Fitch.
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