Clinical Value of Online Measures for Adults With Right Hemisphere Brain Damage In this paper, we argue that online measures hold considerable promise for helping us to understand, assess, and treat communication difficulties that follow right hemisphere brain damage (RHD) in adults. Online techniques contrast with offline assessments, which form the core of clinical practice. Offline measures capture the end products of ... Clinical Forum
Clinical Forum  |   February 01, 1998
Clinical Value of Online Measures for Adults With Right Hemisphere Brain Damage
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Connie A. Tompkins
    University of Pittsburgh, PA
  • Annette Baumgaertner
    University of Pittsburgh, PA
  • Contact author: Connie A. Tompkins, PhD, Department of Communication Science and Disorders, 4033 Forbes Tower, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260
Article Information
Special Populations / Normal Language Processing / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Traumatic Brain Injury / Clinical Forum: Online Measures of Comprehension
Clinical Forum   |   February 01, 1998
Clinical Value of Online Measures for Adults With Right Hemisphere Brain Damage
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 1998, Vol. 7, 68-74. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0701.68
History: Received August 8, 1997 , Accepted December 2, 1997
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 1998, Vol. 7, 68-74. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0701.68
History: Received August 8, 1997; Accepted December 2, 1997

In this paper, we argue that online measures hold considerable promise for helping us to understand, assess, and treat communication difficulties that follow right hemisphere brain damage (RHD) in adults. Online techniques contrast with offline assessments, which form the core of clinical practice. Offline measures capture the end products of the variety of cognitive operations that occur on the way to a final interpretation or response, but online techniques are capable of revealing areas of strength and weakness during language processing. This paper reviews both rationales and data that support the relevance of online techniques for adults with RHD. In addition, clinical implications are discussed that follow from the arguments and evidence we present.

Author Note
This work was supported in part by grants DC00453 and DC01820 from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders. We thank Peggy Lehman for her input and we thank the coauthors of the original papers that were summarized here (Richard Boada, Kathrine McGarry, and Tepanta Fossett). We appreciate the cooperation of the various hospitals and rehabilitation centers that have helped us to identify and recruit patients (Harmarville Rehabilitation Center, Mercy Hospital of Pittsburgh, Presbyterian-University Hospital, and Greater Pittsburgh Rehabilitation Center). Finally, we remain indebted to our patients for their continuing interest and participation in our projects.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access