Online Examination of Language Performance in Normal and Neurologically Impaired Adults This article describes how we and others have exploited online methodology to investigate normal and disordered language processing in adults. Online tasks can be used to measure effects occurring at various temporal points during ongoing processing and are often sensitive to fast-acting, automatic processes, as well as to processes that ... Clinical Forum
Clinical Forum  |   February 01, 1998
Online Examination of Language Performance in Normal and Neurologically Impaired Adults
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lewis Shapiro
    San Diego State University, CA
  • David Swinney
    University of California, San Diego
  • Susan Borsky
    Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton and San Diego State University, CA
  • Contact author: Lewis P. Shapiro, PhD, San Diego State University, Department of Communicative Disorders, 5500 Campanile Drive, San Diego, CA 92182-1518 Email: Shapiro@mail.sdsu.edu
Article Information
Normal Language Processing / Language Disorders / Aphasia / Clinical Forum: Online Measures of Comprehension
Clinical Forum   |   February 01, 1998
Online Examination of Language Performance in Normal and Neurologically Impaired Adults
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 1998, Vol. 7, 49-60. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0701.49
History: Received August 8, 1997 , Accepted December 15, 1997
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 1998, Vol. 7, 49-60. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0701.49
History: Received August 8, 1997; Accepted December 15, 1997

This article describes how we and others have exploited online methodology to investigate normal and disordered language processing in adults. Online tasks can be used to measure effects occurring at various temporal points during ongoing processing and are often sensitive to fast-acting, automatic processes, as well as to processes that rely on the integration and interaction of several types of information. Online tasks can be compared to their offline counterparts, tasks such as sentence-picture matching, categorization, word generation and repetition. These tasks are often used by clinicians as part of their assessment and treatment repertoire and measure effects observed at the end-points of perhaps several processes. They can thus mask a patient's strengths (and weaknesses) in any single area, including subcomponents of the language domain. We review several online lexical and syntactic processing experiments and end with a discussion of the clinical benefits of this work.

Author Note
Much of the work reported in this manuscript was supported by NIH grants DC00494 and DC01948. We thank the following colleagues for allowing us to present their work: Edgar Zurif, Penny Prather, Tracy Love, Joanna Raczaszek, James Lewis, Cynthia Thompson. And, of course, we thank our patients for their continuing efforts in helping us to investigate brain-language relations.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access