Parent-Child Joint Book Reading An Observational Protocol for Young Children Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus  |   February 01, 1998
Parent-Child Joint Book Reading
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Joan N. Kaderavek
    University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
  • Elizabeth Sulzby
    University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
  • Contact author: Joan N. Kaderavek, 528 Elm Street, Perrysburg, OH 43551. Email: jkader@wcnet.org
Article Information
Development / School-Based Settings / Telepractice & Computer-Based Approaches / Normal Language Processing / Language Disorders / Reading & Writing Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus   |   February 01, 1998
Parent-Child Joint Book Reading
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 1998, Vol. 7, 33-47. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0701.33
History: Received June 30, 1997 , Accepted November 18, 1997
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 1998, Vol. 7, 33-47. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0701.33
History: Received June 30, 1997; Accepted November 18, 1997

Research suggests that storybook reading facilitates language development and plays an important role in preparing children for success in school. Children who have early language delays are at risk for reading difficulties in the elementary years. Consequently, speech-language pathologists may want to incorporate one important aspect of early literacy development —parent-child storybook reading—into their remedial programs for some young children with language impairment. This article presents the Kaderavek-Sulzby Bookreading Observational Protocol (KSBOP) as a tool to organize parent-child storybook observations. To facilitate use of this protocol, the authors present the following: (a) background information on the research project from which the KSBOP was developed, (b) foundation knowledge about pertinent emergent literacy theory, and (c) a method for observing parent-child reading interactions with examples of how the protocol was used with a child who was language delayed. An annotated appendix is included.

Author Notes
The collaboration between the authors was supported in part by the National Institutes of Health (1 F32 DC00185-01) through a postdoctoral fellowship to Joan Kaderavek. We extend special appreciation to Dr. Dorothy Aram and Dr. Holly Craig for their reactions to earlier versions of this paper. This paper, and the authors’ collaboration, grew from a presentation at the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association National Convention, November 1993, Anaheim, CA. We thank the American Speech-Language-Hearing Foundation, which sponsored Dr. Sulzby in this presentation regarding oral/written language elicitations and their interpretations.
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