A Response to Yairi and Curlee I wish to thank Professors Curlee and Yairi again for initiating this long overdue and important debate about the benefits of early intervention for stuttering (Curlee & Yairi, 1997). I agree that decisions to initiate or delay stuttering treatment need to be based on scientifically sound research but reiterate my ... Letter to the Editor
Letter to the Editor  |   November 01, 1997
A Response to Yairi and Curlee
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Nan Bernstein Ratner
    University of Maryland College Park, MD
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Special Populations / Early Identification & Intervention / Letters to the Editor
Letter to the Editor   |   November 01, 1997
A Response to Yairi and Curlee
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 1997, Vol. 6, 86-88. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0604.86
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 1997, Vol. 6, 86-88. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0604.86
I wish to thank Professors Curlee and Yairi again for initiating this long overdue and important debate about the benefits of early intervention for stuttering (Curlee & Yairi, 1997). I agree that decisions to initiate or delay stuttering treatment need to be based on scientifically sound research but reiterate my concern that such research can only establish probabilities that an individual treatment decision is correct. With all due respect to Yairi’s extremely important research findings (Yairi & Ambrose, 1992; Yairi, Ambrose, & Niermann, 1993; Yairi, Ambrose, Paden, & Throneburg, 1996), on which I rely heavily in my own clinical advisement, they do not (as Curlee and Yairi appropriately warn) provide speech-language pathologists with any diagnostic “gold standard” for making treatment recommendations.
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