The Clinical-Research Connection in Early Childhood Stuttering A Response to Zebrowski and Bernstein Ratner Letter to the Editor
Letter to the Editor  |   November 01, 1997
The Clinical-Research Connection in Early Childhood Stuttering
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ehud Yairi
    University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • Richard Curlee
    University of Arizona
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Letters to the Editor
Letter to the Editor   |   November 01, 1997
The Clinical-Research Connection in Early Childhood Stuttering
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 1997, Vol. 6, 85-86. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0604.85
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 1997, Vol. 6, 85-86. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0604.85
We appreciate the thoughtful responses of Professors Zebrowski (1997)  and Bernstein Ratner (1997)  to our article on early intervention with early childhood stuttering (Curlee & Yairi, 1997) but hope that their responses do not lead readers to miss a key point. We do not oppose early intervention. We do believe, however, that all clinical intervention decisions should be based on scientifically sound research—research that describes the nature and evolution of childhood stuttering and evaluates the efficacy of early treatment interventions. Additionally, in our judgment, it is difficult to generalize treatment successes with adults to young children who stutter because of epidemiological facts about early childhood stuttering, including spontaneous recovery and the rapidly changing gender ratio, which require special controls. Thus, we shall use this opportunity to address some of the concerns raised in Zebrowski and Bernstein Ratner’s responses.
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