Supraglottal Hyperadduction in an Individual With Parkinson Disease A Clinical Treatment Note Research Article
Research Article  |   November 01, 1997
Supraglottal Hyperadduction in an Individual With Parkinson Disease
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Stefanie Countryman
    Wilbur James Gould Voice Research Center and Denver Center for the Performing Arts, Denver, CO
  • Jennifer Hicks
    Bill Wilkerson Center, Nashville, TN
  • Lorraine Olson Ramig
    University of Colorado, Boulder, Wilbur James Gould Voice Research Center, and Denver Center for the Performing Arts, Denver, CO
  • Marshall E. Smith
    University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and Wilbur James Gould Voice Research Center, Denver, CO
  • Contact author: Lorraine Olson Ramig, PhD, Wilbur James Gould Voice Research Center, 1245 Champa Street, Denver, CO 80204. e-mail: ramig@spot.colorado.edu
Article Information
Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Articles
Research Article   |   November 01, 1997
Supraglottal Hyperadduction in an Individual With Parkinson Disease
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 1997, Vol. 6, 74-84. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0604.74
History: Received June 21, 1997 , Accepted September 15, 1997
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 1997, Vol. 6, 74-84. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0604.74
History: Received June 21, 1997; Accepted September 15, 1997

Recent treatment for voice problems associated with idiopathic Parkinson disease has primarily focused on increasing reduced vocal loudness and improving true vocal fold hypoadduction, common voice deficits observed in these individuals. This study presents an individual with reduced vocal loudness and supraglottic hyperadduction accompanying Parkinson disease and the outcome following a course of the Lee Silverman Voice Treatment (LSVT). Posttreatment observations included increased vocal loudness, decreased supraglottic hyperadduction, and improved intonation and overall voice quality when compared with pretreatment observations. These results suggest that in this individual, supraglottic hyperadduction was due to a secondary compensatory behavior resulting from mild true vocal fold hypoadduction that responded positively to adduction therapy (LSVT). This study also demonstrates the use of a continuum of observations ranging from functional ratings to physiological measures to evaluate the impact of intensive voice treatment and identify mechanisms underlying treatment-related change in an individual with Parkinson disease.

Author Note
The authors wish to express deep gratitude to the individual who participated in this study. This study was supported in part by grants from the Office of Education, National Institute for Disability and Rehabilitative Research (8133G40108) and from the National Institutes of Health, National Institute for Deafness and Communicative Disability (DC01150).
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