The Development of a New Technique for Treating Hypernasality CPAP Clinical Consult
Clinical Consult  |   November 01, 1997
The Development of a New Technique for Treating Hypernasality
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • David P. Kuehn
    University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • Contact author: David P. Kuehn, PhD, Department of Speech and Hearing Science, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 901 South Sixth Street, Champaign, IL 61820 Email: d-kuehn@uiuc.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Clinical Consult
Clinical Consult   |   November 01, 1997
The Development of a New Technique for Treating Hypernasality
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 1997, Vol. 6, 5-8. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0604.05
History: Received May 14, 1997 , Accepted September 11, 1997
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 1997, Vol. 6, 5-8. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0604.05
History: Received May 14, 1997; Accepted September 11, 1997
CPAP stands for continuous positive airway pressure. A procedure involving CPAP has been used for many years to treat patients with sleep apnea. It works by introducing a positive air pressure into the nasal passages of people while they are sleeping. The positive air pressure, which is delivered via a mask worn on the nose, prevents collapse of the upper airway.
The CPAP device is used basically the same way in speech treatment as it is in treating sleep apnea except that in speech treatment the client talks with the mask in place instead of sleeping with it. Also, in speech treatment, the client uses the device while sitting upright rather than lying down. CPAP treatment is designed to strengthen the muscles of velopharyngeal closure and thus to reduce hypernasality.
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