Language and Play Development in Toddlers With Cleft Lip and/or Palate The relationship between play gesture performance and language milestones was examined for 6 children with cleft lip and/or palate at 20, 24, and 30 months of age. Standardized measures of language development, language samples, and a play gesture protocol were administered and analyzed at each assessment. Results showed language delays ... Research Article
Research Article  |   November 01, 1997
Language and Play Development in Toddlers With Cleft Lip and/or Palate
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Nancy J. Scherer
    East Tennessee State University
  • Linda D'Antonio
    Loma Linda University School of Medicine
  • Contact author: Nancy J. Scherer, PhD, Communicative Disorders, Box 70643, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN 37614-0643, scherern@etsu-tn.edu
Article Information
Development / Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Language Disorders / Research Articles
Research Article   |   November 01, 1997
Language and Play Development in Toddlers With Cleft Lip and/or Palate
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 1997, Vol. 6, 48-54. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0604.48
History: Received January 14, 1997 , Accepted July 16, 1997
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 1997, Vol. 6, 48-54. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0604.48
History: Received January 14, 1997; Accepted July 16, 1997

The relationship between play gesture performance and language milestones was examined for 6 children with cleft lip and/or palate at 20, 24, and 30 months of age. Standardized measures of language development, language samples, and a play gesture protocol were administered and analyzed at each assessment. Results showed language delays for several of the children with cleft palate and displayed a complex relationship between play and language development. The results show parallels between single object use and vocabulary development as well as sequential play gestures and structural aspects of language use. Data from this study demonstrated slow play gesture and language development for children with cleft palate only.

Author Note
This study was supported in part by a grant from the Research Development Committee, East Tennessee State University. Our thanks to Lynn Snyder for her comments on an earlier version of the paper and to Beth Imes for assistance in data collection.
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