Development of a Parent Report Measure for Profiling the Conversational Skills of Preschool Children A rating scale was developed for parents to use in profiling the conversational skills of their toddlers and young preschoolers with expressive skills between 12–36 months. The scale items were tested on 60 children with language delays and measured parental perceptions of two types of conversational interactions specifically designed to ... Research Article
Research Article  |   November 01, 1997
Development of a Parent Report Measure for Profiling the Conversational Skills of Preschool Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Luigi Girolametto
    University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Contact author: Luigi Girolametto, Department of Speech-Language Pathology, University of Toronto, 6 Queen’s Park Crescent West, Toronto, ON, Canada M5S 3H2. Email: l.girolametto@utoronto.ca.
Article Information
Special Populations / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Normal Language Processing / Language Disorders / Research Articles
Research Article   |   November 01, 1997
Development of a Parent Report Measure for Profiling the Conversational Skills of Preschool Children
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 1997, Vol. 6, 25-33. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0604.25
History: Received April 1, 1997 , Accepted June 5, 1997
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 1997, Vol. 6, 25-33. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0604.25
History: Received April 1, 1997; Accepted June 5, 1997

A rating scale was developed for parents to use in profiling the conversational skills of their toddlers and young preschoolers with expressive skills between 12–36 months. The scale items were tested on 60 children with language delays and measured parental perceptions of two types of conversational interactions specifically designed to respond to the partner (i.e., answer questions, continue the topic of conversation) and to assert (i.e., request, initiate topics). Evaluation of the psychometric properties of the rating scale indicates that the individual items within each set are correlated with the total scale scores for responsiveness and assertiveness, respectively. Alpha coefficients were stable when calculated for two different samples. Moreover, administering the scale twice to a subset of 20 parents yielded a high degree of short-term test-retest reliability. The profiles of 6 children are presented to illustrate the clinical usefulness of the rating scale as a means of identifying areas of deficit and selecting potential treatment goals. The rating scale provides a clinically useful tool for including parental perceptions in the overall assessment of the young child's communicative ability.

Author Note
This study was sponsored by the Ontario Ministry of Health, and National Health and Welfare Canada. The results and conclusions of this study are those of the author, and no official endorsement by the Ministry is intended or should be inferred. The author is grateful to Carolyn Cronk, Associate Professor (University of Montreal), for assistance in composing, pilot testing and revising items for the rating scale. Appreciation is extended to Elaine Weitzman and Clare Watson (The Hanen Centre, Toronto), Karen Laframboise (Department of Communication Disorders, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto), Farla Klaiman (Play and Learn Nursery School, Toronto), and Deborah Hayden, Deborah Goshulak, and Margit Pukonen (Toronto Children’s Centre, Speech Foundation of Ontario, Toronto) for assistance with item development, subject recruitment, and assessment of children. The contributions of Maureen O’Keefe, research officer, Christiane Kyte and Lisa Henderson, research assistants, and Susan Elgie, statistical consultant, are gratefully acknowledged. Above all, the author is deeply appreciative of the families who freely contributed their time and energy to participate in this study.
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