Supervisees' Perceptions of Supervisors' Social Power in Speech-Language Pathology Most speech-language pathologists function as supervisees and supervisors at various points in their careers (Anderson, 1988). This study investigates supervisees' perceptions of their current and ideal supervisors' social power during the clinical supervisory process in speech-language pathology education. Perceived social power was measured by two modified versions (Wagner, 1994) of ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 1997
Supervisees' Perceptions of Supervisors' Social Power in Speech-Language Pathology
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Barry T. Wagner
    University of North Dakota, Grand Forks
  • Carla W. Hess
    University of North Dakota, Grand Forks
  • Contact author: Barry T. Wagner, PhD, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND 58202-8040 Email: bawagner@plains.nodak.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 1997
Supervisees' Perceptions of Supervisors' Social Power in Speech-Language Pathology
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 1997, Vol. 6, 90-95. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0603.90
History: Received December 18, 1995 , Accepted April 10, 1997
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 1997, Vol. 6, 90-95. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0603.90
History: Received December 18, 1995; Accepted April 10, 1997

Most speech-language pathologists function as supervisees and supervisors at various points in their careers (Anderson, 1988). This study investigates supervisees' perceptions of their current and ideal supervisors' social power during the clinical supervisory process in speech-language pathology education. Perceived social power was measured by two modified versions (Wagner, 1994) of the Rahim Leader Power Inventory (Rahim, 1988). This inventory measures the five French and Raven (1959) social power bases: expert, reward, referent, legitimate, and coercive. Graduate supervisees completed one version of the inventory by rating their current supervisor and a second version of the inventory indicating their ideal supervisor. Results revealed significant differences among supervisees' perceptions of current versus ideal supervisors relative to expert, reward, referent, and legitimate power. Overall, these results have implications for supervisors in speech-language pathology who may wish to modify their perceived social power in order to enhance supervisory relationships.

Author Note
This study was completed as part of the doctoral dissertation by the first author. We would like to thank Rita Naremore, Elizabeth McCrea, Moya Andrews, and Charles Schmidt for their dedicated assistance throughout the completion of the dissertation research. Additionally, we would like to express our appreciation to Patty Jean Gartin for her contribution to the data collection and analysis.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access