The Relative Effects of Questions and Comments on Children's Stuttering Parents of children who stutter often are advised to eliminate or reduce the number of questions they ask a child because of the belief that questions elicit or maintain stuttering. This study compares the effects of questions and requests for verbal responses to comments, studying three preschool-age boys who stutter. ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 1997
The Relative Effects of Questions and Comments on Children's Stuttering
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Joyce R. Wilkenfeld
    University of Arizona
  • Richard F. Curlee
    University of Arizona
  • Contact author: Joyce R. Wilkenfeld, 2121 Kirby Dr., #53, Houston, TX 77019.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 1997
The Relative Effects of Questions and Comments on Children's Stuttering
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 1997, Vol. 6, 79-89. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0603.79
History: Received July 24, 1996 , Accepted May 20, 1997
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 1997, Vol. 6, 79-89. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0603.79
History: Received July 24, 1996; Accepted May 20, 1997

Parents of children who stutter often are advised to eliminate or reduce the number of questions they ask a child because of the belief that questions elicit or maintain stuttering. This study compares the effects of questions and requests for verbal responses to comments, studying three preschool-age boys who stutter. Results showed that stuttering did not vary systematically with the experimenter's questions or requests and comments but occurred more frequently in the children's longer utterances. No support was found for the belief that adults' questions or requests elicit more stuttering than do comments.

Acknowledgments
This report is based on data gathered for a thesis project by the first author under the direction of the second author at the University of Arizona. Special thanks are given to the children who participated in this study, their families, and to Jana Rieger Scarsellone for her assistance throughout the project. In addition, the authors wish to express their gratitude to Anthony Defeo and Audrey Holland for their valuable comments and suggestions.
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