Linguistic Deficits in Children With Reading Disabilities Although recent research into the nature of linguistic abilities and disabilities in children with developmental reading disorders points to phonological processing difficulties as the core deficit in this population, broader-based linguistic deficits have been described in several studies. In this study, children with a primary diagnosis of specific reading disability ... Research Article
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Research Article  |   August 01, 1997
Linguistic Deficits in Children With Reading Disabilities
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Linda J. Lombardino
    University of Florida, Gainesville
  • Cynthia A. Riccio
    University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa
  • George W. Hynd
    University of Georgia, Athens, and Medical College of Georgia
  • Shireen B. Pinheiro
    University of Florida, Gainesville
  • Contact author: Linda J. Lombardino, Department of Communication Processes and Disorders, 464 Dauer Hall, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, 32611 llombard@cpd.ufl.edu
Article Information
Development / Language Disorders / Reading & Writing Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 1997
Linguistic Deficits in Children With Reading Disabilities
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 1997, Vol. 6, 71-78. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0603.71
History: Received April 11, 1996 , Accepted May 20, 1997
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 1997, Vol. 6, 71-78. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0603.71
History: Received April 11, 1996; Accepted May 20, 1997

Although recent research into the nature of linguistic abilities and disabilities in children with developmental reading disorders points to phonological processing difficulties as the core deficit in this population, broader-based linguistic deficits have been described in several studies. In this study, children with a primary diagnosis of specific reading disability (RD) were compared on measures of oral language, phonological coding, reading, and spelling with a clinical contrast group of children diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and with a control group of children developing normally. The results of this study revealed that the RD group showed relatively depressed scores on measures of oral language and phonemic processing when compared with children in the ADHD group. The pattern of language deficits observed in this study clearly contributes to the converging evidence that deficient linguistic processes as measured by both phonological coding tasks and formal tests of oral language characterize the language of children with severe reading disability.

Authors’ Notes
Supported in part by a Grant (R01-HD26890-02) awarded to the third author (GWH) from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHHD), National Institutes of Health (NIH).
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