Word Prompt Programs Current Uses and Future Possibilities Tutorial
Tutorial  |   August 01, 1997
Word Prompt Programs
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lisa A. Wood
    Southwest Missouri State University, Springfield
  • Joan L. Rankin
    University of Nebraska-Lincoln
  • David R. Beukelman
    University of Nebraska-Lincoln and Munroe Meyer Rehabilitation Institute for Genetics and Rehabilitation, Omaha, NE
  • Contact author: Lisa A. Wood, MA, Southwest Missouri State University, Communication Sciences and Disorders, 901 South National Avenue, Springfield, MO 65804
Article Information
Development / Augmentative & Alternative Communication / School-Based Settings / Normal Language Processing / Language Disorders / Reading & Writing Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Tutorials
Tutorial   |   August 01, 1997
Word Prompt Programs
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 1997, Vol. 6, 57-65. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0603.57
History: Received February 10, 1997 , Accepted June 12, 1997
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 1997, Vol. 6, 57-65. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0603.57
History: Received February 10, 1997; Accepted June 12, 1997

Word prompt programs are computer software programs or program features that are used in addition to basic word processing. These programs provide word lists from which a user selects a desired word and inserts it into a line of text. This software is used to support individuals with severe speech, physical, and learning disabilities. This tutorial describes the features of a variety of word prompt programs and reviews the current literature on the use of these programs by people with oral and written language needs. In addition, a matrix that identifies the features contained in eight sample word prompt programs is provided. The descriptions of features and the matrix are designed to assist speech-language pathologists and teachers in evaluating and selecting word prompt programs to support their clients' oral and written communication.

Acknowledgments
The project was funded in part by grant number MCJ-319152 awarded to the Meyer Rehabilitation Institute by the Bureau of Maternal and Child Health Services and the Barkley Trust. The authors wish to thank the members of the Literacy Research Group at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln, Department of Special Education and Communication Disorders, for their assistance.
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