The Use of Contrastive Analysis in Distinguishing Difference From Disorder A Tutorial Tutorial
Tutorial  |   August 01, 1997
The Use of Contrastive Analysis in Distinguishing Difference From Disorder
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Karla K. McGregor
    Northwestern University, Evanston, IL
  • Danielle Williams
    Northwestern University, Evanston, IL
  • Sarah Hearst
    Northwestern University, Evanston, IL
  • Amy C. Johnson
    Northwestern University, Evanston, IL
  • Contact author: Karla K. McGregor, 2299 Campus Dr. N, Evanston, IL 60208. Email: mcgregor@casbah.acns.nwu.edu
Article Information
Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Language Disorders / Tutorials
Tutorial   |   August 01, 1997
The Use of Contrastive Analysis in Distinguishing Difference From Disorder
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 1997, Vol. 6, 45-56. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0603.45
History: Received July 9, 1996 , Accepted March 4, 1997
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 1997, Vol. 6, 45-56. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0603.45
History: Received July 9, 1996; Accepted March 4, 1997

Contrastive analysis aids the identification of true speech-language errors in cases where there is a mismatch between the linguistic communities of the clinician and the client. This tutorial illustrates the procedure via three case studies of preschoolers who speak African American English (AAE). In these case studies, there was good agreement between the results of contrastive analysis and the results of more well-established comparison metrics, suggesting that contrastive analysis can yield valid profiles that aid in distinguishing difference from disorder in children who speak a nonstandard dialect.

Author Notes
We thank Rachel Wooley, who introduced us to the Cabrini Green-Holy Family Head Start staff, and Sharon Brown, who welcomed us into the school and made this data collection possible. Thanks are also extended to Dorothy Westbrook and Kerry Alexander for their valuable assistance with testing. Most importantly, we are grateful to all the children who participated so willingly.
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