Voice Refinement Following Conservation Surgery for Cancer of the Larynx A Conceptual Framework for Treatment Intervention Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus  |   August 01, 1997
Voice Refinement Following Conservation Surgery for Cancer of the Larynx
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Philip C. Doyle
    The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada
  • Contact author: Philip C. Doyle, PhD, School of Communication Sciences and Disorders, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, N6G 1H1, Canada Email: PDOYLE@UWOVAX.UWO.CA
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus   |   August 01, 1997
Voice Refinement Following Conservation Surgery for Cancer of the Larynx
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 1997, Vol. 6, 27-35. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0603.27
History: Received March 13, 1997 , Accepted May 20, 1997
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 1997, Vol. 6, 27-35. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0603.27
History: Received March 13, 1997; Accepted May 20, 1997

This paper addresses the effects of conservation laryngectomy, the outcome of voice quality, and a rationale for voice treatment. Conservation or partial laryngectomy surgical procedures seek to remove malignant tissue but also preserve some laryngeal structures, particularly when larger tumors exist. These procedures attempt to maintain both sphincteric and phonatory function of the postoperative larynx. The extent of surgical resection does not always correlate well with a patient's postoperative voice outcome. Thus, preconceived notions of postsurgical vocal function are often problematic. This tutorial discusses: (a) the rationale underlying the use of conservation laryngectomy procedures, (b) the clinical identification of the anatomical and subsequent physiologic basis of voice change following conservation laryngectomy, (c) the potential for functional compensation by the patient following conservation surgery, and (d) a rationale for voice refinement using treatment methods that traditionally have been employed for benign forms of laryngeal pathophysiology.

Author Notes
Portions of this paper were presented at the 7th Annual Pacific Voice Conference, San Francisco, and at the Annual Convention of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, Orlando, Florida.
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