Vocal Sound Pressure Level and Self-Perception of Speech and Voice in Men and Women With Idiopathic Parkinson Disease This study compared vocal sound pressure level (SPL) and self-perception of speech and voice in men and women with idiopathic Parkinson disease (PD) and in healthy men and women. Thirty subjects with PD (15 men, 15 women) and 14 healthy comparison (HC) subjects (7 men, 7 women) participated in the ... Research Article
Research Article  |   May 01, 1997
Vocal Sound Pressure Level and Self-Perception of Speech and Voice in Men and Women With Idiopathic Parkinson Disease
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Cynthia M. Fox
    National Center for Neurogenic Communication Disorders Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences University of Arizona-Tucson
  • Lorraine Olson Ramig
    Department of Speech-Language-Hearing Science University of Colorado-Boulder Wilbur James Gould Voice Research Center The Denver Center for the Performing Arts National Center for Voice and Speech
  • Contact author: Cynthia M. Fox, MA, Speech & Hearing Sciences, Bldg. #71, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 Email: cynfox@cnet.shs.arizona.edu
Article Information
Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Articles
Research Article   |   May 01, 1997
Vocal Sound Pressure Level and Self-Perception of Speech and Voice in Men and Women With Idiopathic Parkinson Disease
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 1997, Vol. 6, 85-94. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0602.85
History: Received July 17, 1996 , Accepted March 19, 1997
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 1997, Vol. 6, 85-94. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0602.85
History: Received July 17, 1996; Accepted March 19, 1997

This study compared vocal sound pressure level (SPL) and self-perception of speech and voice in men and women with idiopathic Parkinson disease (PD) and in healthy men and women. Thirty subjects with PD (15 men, 15 women) and 14 healthy comparison (HC) subjects (7 men, 7 women) participated in the study. They performed a variety of speech and voice tasks and carried out perceptual self-ratings of nine speech and voice characteristics. To assess performance stability, subjects repeated the data collection procedures on 3 different days. Results revealed that subjects with PD were statistically significantly lower in vocal SPL (2.0–4.0 dB SPL; 30 cm) during speech and voice tasks than HC subjects. Repeated measures across sessions revealed that subjects with PD were not significantly more unstable than HC subjects in their day-to-day performance for all variables examined. In addition, subjects with PD rated themselves as statistically significantly more severely impaired than HC subjects on all nine self-rated perceptual variables examined. These data provide additional descriptive information on speech and voice characteristics in people with PD and may be useful in assessment and treatment planning for this population.

Author Note
This research was supported, in part, by National Multipurpose Research and Training Center Grants P60 DC-00976 and DC-01409 and Research Grant RO1 DC-01150 from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, and Research Grant 8133G40108 from the National Institute for Disability and Rehabilitation Research. Appreciation and gratitude is extended to all subjects who volunteered their time and energy to participate in this study. The authors would like to thank the following persons for their contributions to this paper: from the University of Arizona-Tucson, Dr. Jeanette Hoit; from the Wilbur James Gould Voice Research Center of The Denver Center for The Performing Arts, Ms. Deborah Huhn and Mr. Geron Coale.
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