Social Validity of the Treatment Outcomes of an Early Intervention Program for Stuttering This research was designed to provide a socially valid evaluation of the posttreatment speech of children who received an operant treatment for early stuttering (The Lidcombe Program). Part A compared the posttreatment percent syllables stuttered (%SS) for preschool and school-age children with nonstuttering control children matched for age and sex. ... Research Article
Research Article  |   May 01, 1997
Social Validity of the Treatment Outcomes of an Early Intervention Program for Stuttering
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Michelle A. Lincoln
    The University of Sydney, Australia
  • Mark Onslow
    The University of Sydney, Australia
  • Vicki Reed
    The University of Sydney, Australia
  • Contact author: Michelle Lincoln, School of Communication Disorders, The University of Sydney, PO Box 170, Lidcombe, New South Wales, 2141, Australia E-mail: m.lincoln@cchs.su.edu.au
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Special Populations / Early Identification & Intervention / Research Articles
Research Article   |   May 01, 1997
Social Validity of the Treatment Outcomes of an Early Intervention Program for Stuttering
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 1997, Vol. 6, 77-84. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0602.77
History: Received January 5, 1996 , Accepted September 20, 1996
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 1997, Vol. 6, 77-84. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0602.77
History: Received January 5, 1996; Accepted September 20, 1996

This research was designed to provide a socially valid evaluation of the posttreatment speech of children who received an operant treatment for early stuttering (The Lidcombe Program). Part A compared the posttreatment percent syllables stuttered (%SS) for preschool and school-age children with nonstuttering control children matched for age and sex. This study found that both groups attracted similar measures of %SS. Part B compared the number of "stuttering" versus "not stuttering" judgments made by experienced clinicians and unsophisticated listeners on the same speech samples. Control children were identified as "stuttering" significantly more than the treated children. The clinician listeners identified significantly more control samples and posttreatment samples as stuttering than the unsophisticated listeners. The implications of these results are discussed. It is concluded that The Lidcombe Program resulted in socially valid modifications in the participant's speech.

Author Note
The authors would like to thank all the listeners and children who participated in this study.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access