Cognitive-Communication Abilities in Children With Closed Head Injury The cognitive-communicative needs of children and adolescents with closed head injury (CHI) are an important responsibility facing speech-language pathologists today. Growing evidence suggests that the communicative disability of this population is not being adequately addressed. This article discusses ways that we can improve the situation through (a) recognition that traditional ... Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus  |   May 01, 1997
Cognitive-Communication Abilities in Children With Closed Head Injury
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sandra Bond Chapman
    Callier Center for Communication Disorders, University of Texas at Dallas
  • Contact author: Sandra Bond Chapman, PhD, Callier Center for Communication Disorders, University of Texas at Dallas, 1966 Inwood Road, Dallas, TX 75235 Email: schapman@utdallas.edu
Article Information
Language Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Traumatic Brain Injury / Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus   |   May 01, 1997
Cognitive-Communication Abilities in Children With Closed Head Injury
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 1997, Vol. 6, 50-58. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0602.50
History: Received July 29, 1996 , Accepted March 13, 1997
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 1997, Vol. 6, 50-58. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0602.50
History: Received July 29, 1996; Accepted March 13, 1997

The cognitive-communicative needs of children and adolescents with closed head injury (CHI) are an important responsibility facing speech-language pathologists today. Growing evidence suggests that the communicative disability of this population is not being adequately addressed. This article discusses ways that we can improve the situation through (a) recognition that traditional approaches based on children with developmental language impairments (LI) will be insufficient to identify the deficits in children with CHI and (b) through use of discourse measures in assessment and treatment. Narrative discourse measures, in particular, have been shown to be more sensitive outcome measures of the cognitive-communicative problems resulting from severe CHI than are structured language tests. In addition, we present a method for analyzing narrative discourse, with examples from children with CHI.

Author Note
The Child Recovery Project is an ongoing, longitudinal research project conducted at the Callier Center for Communication Disorders, University of Texas at Dallas. The study reported in this article is supported by grant NS-21889. I wish to express my appreciation to Connie Wright and Stacy Lawyer for help in manuscript preparation. I also gratefully acknowledge contributions by Ruth Watkins.
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