Assessing Children’s Knowledge of Multiple Meaning Words Knowledge of multiple meaning words is important for oral and written communication. This research concerned the assessment of such knowledge. Elementary school children with language-learning difficulties (N=32) defined multiple meaning words presented in two test formats, one that included context and one that did not. Presentation of a target meaning ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 1997
Assessing Children’s Knowledge of Multiple Meaning Words
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Carla J. Johnson
    University of Toronto, Ontario
  • Margaret E. Ionson
    Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario
  • Sonya M. Torreiter
    University of Toronto, Ontario
  • Contact author: Carla J. Johnson, Department of Speech-Language Pathology, University of Toronto, 6 Queen’s Park Crescent West, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5S 3H2.
    Contact author: Carla J. Johnson, Department of Speech-Language Pathology, University of Toronto, 6 Queen’s Park Crescent West, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5S 3H2.×
  • Corresponding author: Email: carla.johnson@utoronto.ca
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 1997
Assessing Children’s Knowledge of Multiple Meaning Words
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 1997, Vol. 6, 77-86. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0601.77
History: Received December 27, 1995 , Accepted October 28, 1996
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 1997, Vol. 6, 77-86. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0601.77
History: Received December 27, 1995; Accepted October 28, 1996

Knowledge of multiple meaning words is important for oral and written communication. This research concerned the assessment of such knowledge. Elementary school children with language-learning difficulties (N=32) defined multiple meaning words presented in two test formats, one that included context and one that did not. Presentation of a target meaning in a sentence context significantly aided definitional performance, but benefits of context were more evident for some meanings and words than for others. Performance in defining individual meanings correlated strongly with patterns of item difficulty established in a previous study of written meaning recognition. Implications are considered for assessment, intervention, and future research concerning knowledge of multiple meaning words.

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