Stability of Maternal Reports of Lexical Comprehension in Very Young Children With Developmental Delays The MacArthur Communication Development Inventory: Infant Scale (CDI/I) is among the strongest measures of early lexical comprehension (Fenson et al., 1994). The present study examined the stability of CDI/I results over a 2-week period in a sample of 17 mothers of children with developmental delays. Test-retest stability was computed for ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 1997
Stability of Maternal Reports of Lexical Comprehension in Very Young Children With Developmental Delays
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Paul J. Yoder
    Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN
  • Steven F. Warren
    Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN
  • Heather A. Biggar
    Bethesda, MD
  • Contact author: Paul J. Yoder, PhD, Box 328, Peabody of Vanderbilt, Nashville, TN 37203
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 1997
Stability of Maternal Reports of Lexical Comprehension in Very Young Children With Developmental Delays
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 1997, Vol. 6, 59-64. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0601.59
History: Received September 18, 1995 , Accepted June 27, 1996
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 1997, Vol. 6, 59-64. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0601.59
History: Received September 18, 1995; Accepted June 27, 1996

The MacArthur Communication Development Inventory: Infant Scale (CDI/I) is among the strongest measures of early lexical comprehension (Fenson et al., 1994). The present study examined the stability of CDI/I results over a 2-week period in a sample of 17 mothers of children with developmental delays. Test-retest stability was computed for total number of words understood (i.e., summary-level stability) and for word-by-word agreement (i.e., item-by-item stability) across a 2-week interval. Results indicated that although there was excellent summary level stability, there was, in many cases, inadequate item-by-item agreement between the two testing occasions. The degree to which mothers were consistent on an item-by-item basis varied as a function of the types of words they were reporting on, the occupational status and educational level of the mothers, and the extent to which mothers confidently interpret nonlinguistic child behavior. These data illustrate that the CDI/I can be used to identify overall vocabulary deficits and specific word classes that are under-represented, but not to identify specific words for remediation.

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