The Relationship Between Degree of Audible Struggle and Judgments of Childhood Disfluencies as Stuttered or Not Stuttered This study investigated whether degree of audible struggle can be used to categorically distinguish childhood stuttered disfluencies from normal disfluencies. Twenty-nine first-year graduate students in communication disorders listened, on two occasions, to 100 disfluent utterances provided by 10 preschool-aged children. Fourteen listeners judged whether each utterance was stuttered or not ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 1997
The Relationship Between Degree of Audible Struggle and Judgments of Childhood Disfluencies as Stuttered or Not Stuttered
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Joy Armson
    Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia
  • Sarah Jenson
    Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia
  • Diane Gallant
    Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia
  • Joseph Kalinowski
    Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia
  • E. Jane Fee
    Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia
  • Contact author: Joy Armson, School of Human Communication Disorders, Dalhousie University, 5599 Fenwick St., Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada B3H 1R2
    Contact author: Joy Armson, School of Human Communication Disorders, Dalhousie University, 5599 Fenwick St., Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada B3H 1R2×
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: jarmson@dal.ca
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 1997
The Relationship Between Degree of Audible Struggle and Judgments of Childhood Disfluencies as Stuttered or Not Stuttered
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 1997, Vol. 6, 42-50. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0601.42
History: Received January 18, 1996 , Accepted June 5, 1996
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 1997, Vol. 6, 42-50. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0601.42
History: Received January 18, 1996; Accepted June 5, 1996

This study investigated whether degree of audible struggle can be used to categorically distinguish childhood stuttered disfluencies from normal disfluencies. Twenty-nine first-year graduate students in communication disorders listened, on two occasions, to 100 disfluent utterances provided by 10 preschool-aged children. Fourteen listeners judged whether each utterance was stuttered or not stuttered, and 15 listeners used a 7-point scale to rate the degree of struggle heard in each utterance. Binary logistic regression analysis indicated that as the perception of degree of struggle increased, so did the likelihood that the disfluent production would be judged as stuttered (p < 0.00001). For those utterances having high agreement regarding disfluency classification, average ratings of struggle were found to categorically distinguish between stuttered and nonstuttered classes of disfluency. It is suggested that a rating scale for degree of struggle may be a useful clinical tool for diagnosing childhood stuttering. Further study is needed to more fully explore the potential applications of such a tool.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access