Case Studies for Evaluating Statistical Significance in Group Designs We present a tutorial for evaluating statistical significance in research reports when t, F, or X2 is the primary statistic. The article is intended to help speech-language pathologists evaluate research conclusions so that they can decide if the result is meaningful for their practice. To this end, we explain the ... Tutorial
Tutorial  |   February 1997
Case Studies for Evaluating Statistical Significance in Group Designs
 
Author Notes
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: TMELINE@PANAM.EDU
  • © American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Tutorial
Tutorial   |   February 1997
Case Studies for Evaluating Statistical Significance in Group Designs
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 1997, Vol. 6, 33-41. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0601.33
History: Received May 15, 1996 , Accepted September 9, 1996
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 1997, Vol. 6, 33-41. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0601.33
History: Received May 15, 1996; Accepted September 9, 1996

We present a tutorial for evaluating statistical significance in research reports when t, F, or X2 is the primary statistic. The article is intended to help speech-language pathologists evaluate research conclusions so that they can decide if the result is meaningful for their practice. To this end, we explain the value of "practical significance" and describe the metric known as "effect size." The use of effect-size measures is illustrated in a variety of case studies that are drawn from the communication disorders literature.

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