Comments on “Aphasia Treatment in the Early Postonset Period: Managing Our Resources Effectively” Marshall suggests that potential changes in reimbursement for aphasia treatment may require clinicians to treat some patients and not others, ration or defer treatment, and emphasize treatment that results in a functional outcome that reduces the overall cost of care. He encourages clinicians to use the “rich clinical and ... Second Opinion
Second Opinion  |   February 01, 1997
Comments on “Aphasia Treatment in the Early Postonset Period: Managing Our Resources Effectively”
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Robert T. Wertz
    Veterans Administration Medical Center and Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN
  • Contact author: Robert T. Wertz, PhD, Audiology and Speech Pathology, VA Medical Center, 1310 24th Avenue, South, Nashville, TN 37212
    Contact author: Robert T. Wertz, PhD, Audiology and Speech Pathology, VA Medical Center, 1310 24th Avenue, South, Nashville, TN 37212×
Article Information
Second Opinions
Second Opinion   |   February 01, 1997
Comments on “Aphasia Treatment in the Early Postonset Period: Managing Our Resources Effectively”
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 1997, Vol. 6, 12-18. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0601.12
History: Received January 21, 1996 , Accepted May 21, 1996
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 1997, Vol. 6, 12-18. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0601.12
History: Received January 21, 1996; Accepted May 21, 1996
Marshall suggests that potential changes in reimbursement for aphasia treatment may require clinicians to treat some patients and not others, ration or defer treatment, and emphasize treatment that results in a functional outcome that reduces the overall cost of care. He encourages clinicians to use the “rich clinical and experimental literature to make the difficult decisions required by managed care,” specifically, to guide decisions about providing treatment during the first 3 months postonset.
Twice, Marshall urges us “to think of ‘MORE’ rather than less if the interests of clients with aphasia are to remain paramount.” I infer that this means clinicians need to do more thinking about what they can do to assist people with aphasia if changes in health care limit them to doing less. So, let’s think about potential changes in health care, whether the literature is sufficient to guide decisions about what we might do most effectively when, and whether knowing will make any difference.
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