To Treat or Not to Treat Rhea Paul’s recent article (1996a, 1996b) and her interaction with Marilyn Nippold and Ilse Schwarz (1996a, 1996b) bring to light an issue that is near and dear to my heart; that is, when or even if to intervene with an individual who meets some criterion for “disorder” or “delay.” ... Letter to the Editor
Letter to the Editor  |   November 01, 1996
To Treat or Not to Treat
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Peter Flipsen, Jr.
    University of Wisconsin-Madison
Article Information
Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Letter to the Editor
Letter to the Editor   |   November 01, 1996
To Treat or Not to Treat
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 1996, Vol. 5, 56-57. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0504.53
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 1996, Vol. 5, 56-57. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0504.53
Rhea Paul’s recent article (1996a, 1996b) and her interaction with Marilyn Nippold and Ilse Schwarz (1996a, 1996b) bring to light an issue that is near and dear to my heart; that is, when or even if to intervene with an individual who meets some criterion for “disorder” or “delay.” Paul presents a compelling case (at least I think so) for a “watch and see” approach for children with late onset of expressive language. Her data and those of several others suggest that a very significant portion of these children will catch up to their typically-developing peers. Although Nippold and Schwarz disagree with Paul on whether they actually do catch up, two important issues arise from their discussion that are worth emphasizing.
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