The Relationship Between Objective Measures and Listeners’ Judgments of the Communicative Informativeness of the Connected Discourse of Adults With Aphasia In this study, the connected discourse of 25 adults with aphasia was rated on the dimension of “informativeness” by 11 unfamiliar listeners using a direct magnitude estimation (DME) procedure. These ratings were subsequently compared to objective measures of communicative informativeness to determine the strength of their relationship. The results indicated ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 1996
The Relationship Between Objective Measures and Listeners’ Judgments of the Communicative Informativeness of the Connected Discourse of Adults With Aphasia
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Patrick J. Doyle
    Highland Drive VA Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA
  • Dina Tsironas
    Highland Drive VA Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA
  • Amy J. Goda
    Highland Drive VA Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA
  • Michelene Kalinyak
    Highland Drive VA Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA
Article Information
Language Disorders / Aphasia / Research Article
Research Article   |   August 01, 1996
The Relationship Between Objective Measures and Listeners’ Judgments of the Communicative Informativeness of the Connected Discourse of Adults With Aphasia
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 1996, Vol. 5, 53-60. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0503.53
History: Received September 5, 1995 , Accepted January 25, 1996
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 1996, Vol. 5, 53-60. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0503.53
History: Received September 5, 1995; Accepted January 25, 1996

In this study, the connected discourse of 25 adults with aphasia was rated on the dimension of “informativeness” by 11 unfamiliar listeners using a direct magnitude estimation (DME) procedure. These ratings were subsequently compared to objective measures of communicative informativeness to determine the strength of their relationship. The results indicated that the objective measures were strongly correlated with listeners’ judgments of informativeness and that overall severity of aphasia did not fully account for listeners’ judgments.

Acknowledgments
The research activities described in this manuscript were first reported at the 24th Annual Clinical Aphasiology Conference in Traverse City, MI, on June 6, 1994.
I gratefully acknowledge the Department of Veterans Affairs Rehabilitation Research and Development Service for their support of the research activities described in this paper (VA rR&D Project Number C330 4RA).
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