Dysphonia Following Nonsurgical Management of Advanced Laryngeal Carcinoma Traditionally, laryngectomy has been the medical treatment of choice for patients with advanced cancer of the larynx, and voice clinicians have been largely concerned, not with these patients’ dysphonia, but with subsequent alaryngeal voice restoration. Recently, there has been a trend in the management of advanced laryngeal cancer to treat ... Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus  |   August 01, 1996
Dysphonia Following Nonsurgical Management of Advanced Laryngeal Carcinoma
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Robert F. Orlikoff
    Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York
  • Dennis H. Kraus
    Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: orlikofr@mskcc.org
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Special Populations / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus   |   August 01, 1996
Dysphonia Following Nonsurgical Management of Advanced Laryngeal Carcinoma
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 1996, Vol. 5, 47-52. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0503.47
History: Received November 10, 1995 , Accepted April 26, 1996
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 1996, Vol. 5, 47-52. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0503.47
History: Received November 10, 1995; Accepted April 26, 1996

Traditionally, laryngectomy has been the medical treatment of choice for patients with advanced cancer of the larynx, and voice clinicians have been largely concerned, not with these patients’ dysphonia, but with subsequent alaryngeal voice restoration. Recently, there has been a trend in the management of advanced laryngeal cancer to treat patients with radiation therapy or chemoradiation with the intent of larynx preservation. Although such organ preservation treatment may render the patient free of disease, voice complaints and communicative disabilities frequently continue. These dysphonias represent a new challenge for the voice clinician, who must help the patient cope with what are often highly variable and unpredictable vocal characteristics. This article discusses how advanced glottic cancer and its treatment may contribute to such vocal disturbance, provides some illustrative case examples, and suggests how the clinician can best devise strategies for management.

Acknowledgment
Different portions of this paper were presented on April 2, 1995, at the First Mid-South Head and Neck Cancer Conference in Memphis, TN, and on October 21, 1995, at the Eighth Annual Pacific Voice Conference—Clinical Solutions to Surgically and Therapeutically Challenging Dysphonias, in San Francisco, CA.
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