Effect of Intraoral Prostheses on Swallowing Function in Postsurgical Oral and Oropharyngeal Cancer Patients This study investigated the effect of intraoral-prostheses on swallowing function in 13 postsurgical oral and oropharyngeal cancer patients. Three subjects had resections of the soft palate with no involvement of the tongue. Ten subjects had resections of the posterior oral cavity or oropharynx including resection of the oral tongue, tongue ... Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus  |   August 01, 1996
Effect of Intraoral Prostheses on Swallowing Function in Postsurgical Oral and Oropharyngeal Cancer Patients
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Barbara Roa Pauloski
    Northwestern University, Evanston, IL
  • Jerilyn A. Logemann
    Northwestern University, Evanston, IL
  • Laura A. Colangelo
    Northwestern University, Evanston, IL
  • David Stein
    University of Pittsburgh Eye and Ear Institute
  • Quinter Beery
    University of Pittsburgh Eye and Ear Institute
  • Mary Anne Heiser
    Roswell Park Memorial Institute, Buffalo, NY
  • Salvatore Cardinale
    Roswell Park Memorial Institute, Buffalo, NY
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Special Populations / Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus   |   August 01, 1996
Effect of Intraoral Prostheses on Swallowing Function in Postsurgical Oral and Oropharyngeal Cancer Patients
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 1996, Vol. 5, 31-46. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0503.31
History: Received August 31, 1995 , Accepted April 18, 1996
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 1996, Vol. 5, 31-46. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0503.31
History: Received August 31, 1995; Accepted April 18, 1996

This study investigated the effect of intraoral-prostheses on swallowing function in 13 postsurgical oral and oropharyngeal cancer patients. Three subjects had resections of the soft palate with no involvement of the tongue. Ten subjects had resections of the posterior oral cavity or oropharynx including resection of the oral tongue, tongue base, soft palate, tonsil, and/or mandible. Patients received either an obturator only, a maxillary reshaping/lowering prosthesis, or an obturator combined with a maxillary reshaping/lowering prosthesis. Swallowing was examined with and without the prosthesis 3 months posthealing using videofluoroscopy; results are presented in the form of case reports. The majority of patients had either unchanged swallowing function or mixed results (i.e., improvement for some but not all bolus consistencies) when using an intraoral prosthesis. The extent of surgical resection, type of reconstruction, and postoperative radiotherapy had an impact on the type of prosthesis constructed and the patient’s ultimate swallowing ability. Despite the swallowing dysfunction demonstrated by some of the patients, all were able to maintain oral intake either with or without the prosthesis in place.

Acknowledgments
This project was supported by NIH/NCI research grant #P01- CA40007.
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