An Assessment of Pitch-Matching Abilities Among Speech-Language Pathology Graduate Students The pitch-matching abilities of speech-language pathology graduate students were investigated. Subjects (N=86) attempted to match prerecorded human-voice and pitch-pipe models of the tones C4, D4, E4, G4, and B4. Mean fundamental frequencies of subject responses were calculated and then converted to semitones. Eighty three percent of the tones were matched ... Research Article
Research Article  |   May 01, 1996
An Assessment of Pitch-Matching Abilities Among Speech-Language Pathology Graduate Students
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jennifer Barnes Weiner
    Speechpath, Cincinnati, OH
  • Linda Lee
    University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH
  • Jeannette Cataland
    Columbus Speech & Hearing Center, Columbus, OH
  • Joseph C. Stemple
    Institute for Voice Analysis and Rehabilitation, Dayton, OH
  • Contact author: Jennifer Barnes Weiner, MA, Speechpath, 4411 Montgomery Road, Cincinnati, OH 45212
    Contact author: Jennifer Barnes Weiner, MA, Speechpath, 4411 Montgomery Road, Cincinnati, OH 45212×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Articles
Research Article   |   May 01, 1996
An Assessment of Pitch-Matching Abilities Among Speech-Language Pathology Graduate Students
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 1996, Vol. 5, 91-95. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0502.91
History: Received September 21, 1994 , Accepted September 15, 1995
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 1996, Vol. 5, 91-95. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0502.91
History: Received September 21, 1994; Accepted September 15, 1995

The pitch-matching abilities of speech-language pathology graduate students were investigated. Subjects (N=86) attempted to match prerecorded human-voice and pitch-pipe models of the tones C4, D4, E4, G4, and B4. Mean fundamental frequencies of subject responses were calculated and then converted to semitones. Eighty three percent of the tones were matched within plus or minus one semitone. However, 47% of the subjects were two or more semitones away from the expected tone on two to nine of the ten tones presented. Tones produced in imitation of the human voice were closer to the target than those produced in imitation of the pitch pipe.

Acknowledgments
The authors are grateful to Laura Kretschmer for editorial comments and Diya Dutt for statistical assistance.
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