The Influence of Recording Systems on Jitter and Shimmer Estimates In this study, the influence of recording systems on the important clinical voice parameters of jitter and shimmer was examined. Simulated voice samples (i.e., triangular waveforms) of 100 Hz, 200 Hz, and 400 Hz were captured through analog cassette recording, digital audiotape (DAT) recording, and direct-to-computer sampling. Results indicated that ... Research Article
Research Article  |   May 01, 1996
The Influence of Recording Systems on Jitter and Shimmer Estimates
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Cecyle K. Perry
    University of Wyoming
  • Dennis R-S Ingrisano
    University of Northern Colorado
  • W. Brent Blair
    Wyoming Medical Center, Casper, WY
  • Contact author: Cecyle K. Perry, University Station, PO Box 3311, University of Wyoming, SPPA Department, Laramie, WY 82071-3311
    Contact author: Cecyle K. Perry, University Station, PO Box 3311, University of Wyoming, SPPA Department, Laramie, WY 82071-3311×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Articles
Research Article   |   May 01, 1996
The Influence of Recording Systems on Jitter and Shimmer Estimates
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 1996, Vol. 5, 86-90. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0502.86
History: Received October 14, 1994 , Accepted July 17, 1995
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 1996, Vol. 5, 86-90. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0502.86
History: Received October 14, 1994; Accepted July 17, 1995

In this study, the influence of recording systems on the important clinical voice parameters of jitter and shimmer was examined. Simulated voice samples (i.e., triangular waveforms) of 100 Hz, 200 Hz, and 400 Hz were captured through analog cassette recording, digital audiotape (DAT) recording, and direct-to-computer sampling. Results indicated that the analog recording introduced a statistically significant amount of jitter and shimmer error into the analysis as compared to DAT and direct-to-computer recording. Findings support the use of DAT recorders and direct-to-computer captures in the context of select voice assessment.

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